Culture + Style

View From Above: New Orleans

Crescent City Connection Bridge (Photo: Joshua Brasted)

New Orleans reveals its true beauty and spirit to only its most patient visitors. To capture the Crescent City at its most vulnerable, sneak away from the rowdy crush of tourists to a quiet rooftop or a tucked-away balcony. As day turns to evening, watch as the city reveals its secrets.

Crescent City Connection

Crescent City Connection Bridge (Photo: Joshua Brasted)
Crescent City Connection Bridge (Photo: Joshua Brasted)

The distant Crescent City Connection bridge spans the Mississippi River, the reason why New Orleans arose where it did. In the 19th century the city was the busiest port in America, with steamships and barges unloading cargo from the interior to be transferred to ocean-going ships serving the eastern seaboard, Europe and the world. This view overlooks what’s now called the Warehouse District, home to hotels, restaurants and art galleries.

Superdome

Superdome (Photo: Joshua Brasted)
Superdome (Photo: Joshua Brasted)

The Mercedes Benz Superdome — here glowing in purple thanks to a lighting upgrade a few years ago — got an extensive makeover after Hurricane Katrina, and is the proud home of the NFL’s New Orleans Saints. Just to the left of the Dome is the Smoothie King Center, where the NBA’s New Orleans Pelicans roost. At Union Station, lower left, Amtrak, Greyhound and the city streetcar converge. Both sports arenas are just a 10 minute walk to the French Quarter.

Mardi Gras from Balcony of One Eyed Jacks

Mardi Gras 2012 from Balcony of One Eyed Jacks (Photo: Joshua Brasted)
Mardi Gras 2012 from Balcony of One Eyed Jacks (Photo: Joshua Brasted)

Mardi Gras probably isn’t what you think it is. It’s the culmination of two weeks or more of family gathers and neighborhood parades, which conclude with an epic street party that spans the city. Mardi Gras isn’t something you watch — to do it right, you need to participate. Many revelers descend on the French Quarter at some point during the day, such as the crowd here on Toulouse Street, in front of One Eyed Jack’s nightclub.

Voodoo Festival from City Park

Voodoo Music and Arts Festival in City Park (Photo: Joshua Brasted)
Voodoo Music and Arts Festival in City Park (Photo: Joshua Brasted)

Visitors will find a festival underway in New Orleans nearly every weekend throughout the year. From the internationally renown New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival held each spring, to smaller neighborhood events like the Po-Boy Festival, you needn’t go far to find entertainment and diversion. Shown here: Voodoo Festival, held at City Park’s festival grounds around Halloween, draws national performers like Skrillex and Foo Fighters, who mix it up with local talent.